The Problem with Being Politically Correct

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Love this as it relates to leadership and life:

The institutionalization of politically correct thinking has done more to harm operating businesses than just about any other social and/or cultural influence in recent times.

I don’t know about you, but it’s almost as if we’ve raised a generation of leaders who feel they have a moral and ethical obligation to be politically correct—wrong. Their responsibility is to be correct; not politically correct. The harsh truth is politically correct thinking is a large contributor to an increase in mediocre behavior, a decrease in workplace productivity, and of greater concern, to the moral and ethical decay of our society. Are these extreme statements? Perhaps some may think so, but being authentic to my politically incorrect self, I think not.

What’s troubling to me, and I hope to you, is that politically correct assault has invaded classrooms; the media; the work place; federal, state, and local government; the judiciary; the church; the military; and even casual discussions with friends and family. It has spread to pandemic proportions, crossing boarders and cultures, such that you’d be hard pressed to actually find organizations where tough, candid conversations frequently take place without HR mediating them.

Few things will send morale and productivity into decline faster than leadership that adopts a politically correct mind-set. Before those of dissenting (politically correct) opinions become too outraged with my position, let me be perfectly clear; I believe strongly in respect and compassion. These characteristics should be present in all human beings. They are admirable qualities so long as they don’t take precedence over, ignore, or contradict truth.

The main problem with politically correct thinking is that it confuses kindness and courtesy with bureaucratic mandates, and ends up stripping people of their real opinions. I’m not advocating being mean-spirited, arrogant, judgmental, or self-righteous—quite to the contrary. It is very possible, and preferable, to have truth and compassion co-exist without being subject to political correctness. -Mike Myatt, Hacking Leadership: The 11 Gaps Every Business Needs to Close and the Secrets to Closing Them Quickly

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Links I Like

Links I Like is a collection of blogs, articles and books I’ve come across recently and thought they were worth sharing. Click here for past Links I Like.

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5 things your pastor would like to tell you.

Brian Dodd on 12 signs of a healthy team.

Have you ever been part of a failing church leadership team?  I have.  It is a frustrating experience knowing a great opportunity is being wasted and not taken advantage of.  Apathy set in and you simply have to pray God will do something great in spite of your team. No one wants to be part of such a leadership team.

How Bill Hybels stays replenished.

Derwin Gray on 3 ways to spice up your love life.

Our culture teaches us to idolize sex and romance and ultimately, the idolization of erotic love will sabotage a marriage.

Carlos Whittaker on How to avoid porn.

“That’s someone’s sister, daughter, mother, friend. And they are sad.”

Brandon Cox on How to lovingly disagree with people.

So, if you disagree in a way that is unkind or impatient, you’re in the wrong. If your disagreement fuels jealousy or pride, you’re wrong. If you’re bull-headed and refuse to be a listener, then you’re demanding your own way. If you get angry or hold a grudge over a disagreement, you’re wrong, even if you’re right. If you get upset when someone else is proven to be right instead of you, you’re doubly wrong. And if you disagree with people and allow it to cause you to lose faith or hope? You’re wrong, even if you’re right.

 
 
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Book Notes | The Greatest Communicator

bookI love pretty much any book on communication, leadership or history. Dick Wirthlin’s book The Greatest Communicator: What Ronald Reagan Taught Me about Politics, Leadership, and Life combine all three beautifully. Dick was in Reagan’s inner circle from 1968 through the end of his life. This book provides a unique perspective on not only Reagan, but also the topics of leadership and communication.

If you preach, this is a book you need to check out.

Here are some lessons that stood out:

  • Leadership is always a battled waged at incalculable costs – both personal and professional.
  • You cannot not communicate.
  • There is no way a human being can do anything without in some way communicating a message – verbally or nonverbally.
  • For better or worse, not what is, but what appears to be, often determines the image of public figures.
  • A leader’s every move has the potential to communicate meaning in powerful ways, either implicitly or explicitly.
  • If you are always prepared you will never have anything to fear.
  • Leadership has the power to persuade in ways that change people’s lives.
  • Persuade through reason. Motivate through emotion.
  • Values are the strategic linchpins of effective persuasion.
  • Great communicators speak for people, not just to them.
  • For a leader, words are themselves a form of action.

New Series @ Revolution | Breathing Room

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Ever feel like you can’t catch your breath? You run from one thing to the next with no down time. Your finances are always on the edge. You have no balance in life, work and family.
Breathing room.
It sounds like a cruel joke. Yet, if you were to tell your friends that you are tired, worn out, or on the edge of financial ruin, your friends will tell you to find some breathing room. 
 
But, what is breathing room? And how you find it?
We’re going to answer those questions and more as we begin a brand new year at Revolution Church.
Here’s what we’ll cover:
  • December 29: Squeezed
  • January 5: Time Management
  • January 12: Dollars and Sense
  • January 19: Choosing to Cheat – When Work and Family Collide

Links I Like

Links I Like is a collection of blogs, articles and books I’ve come across recently and thought they were worth sharing. Click here for past Links I Like.

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  1. Rich Birch on How to evaluate a sunday service.
  2. Make sure the books you read actual have a biblical message. Just because it is a “Christian” book or written by a “pastor” doesn’t make it theologically correct.
  3. Russell Moore on How Christians should be involved in politics.
  4. Tim Challies on 18 things I will not regret doing with my wife. Great advice for husbands.
  5. A biblical approach to dating.
  6. David Mathis on Why it’s important for a preacher to find his voice.
  7. Tim Challies on 18 things I will not regret doing with my kids. Dad’s, read this.
  8. How to call people to follow Jesus without an altar call.
  9. Mark Munsey on Quit Mothering.

Links I Like

Links I Like is a collection of blogs, articles and books I’ve come across recently and thought they were worth sharing. Click here for past Links I Like.

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  1. Barnabas Piper for those who are tired of the same sex marriage debate.
  2. Mark Hampton on 8 tips for those taking summer missions trips.
  3. Charles Stone on 4 things pastors can do to prepare for the post-easter lull.
  4. Ed Stetzer on How to not waste your Easter spike.
  5. Lou Schuler on His favorite book about weightlifting. I’m pretty interested to read this book.

Links I Like

Links I Like is a collection of blogs, articles and books I’ve come across recently and thought they were worth sharing. Click here for past Links I Like

Links of the Week

  1. Michael Hyatt on How to handle people who abuse trust.
  2. Can’t wait for this book to come out.
  3. Tim Keller on Politics and Culture. So many good insights in this piece, but what else would you expect from Tim Keller.
  4. Why Christians go postal over facebook, Jay-Z, Yoga, Avatar and culture in general. I think most Christians go crazy online because they can do it from the comfort of their home.
  5. Ed Stetzer on Trends in church planting.
  6. Growing generosity in kids at Christmas. As a parent, this was a really helpful article.
  7. Mark Driscoll on 10 ways the doctrine of suffering is mistaught. Great insights into how we should handle and think about suffering from a biblical perspective.
  8. Ron Edmondson on 5 do’s and don’ts of how to deal with pastors during the christmas season.
  9. Two reasons church planters often avoid big cities.
  10. Tony Morgan on 10 keys to creating a staff strategy. Great insights.
  11. Here is a great video interview with D.A. Carson. Definitely worth the time, so much wisdom.
  12. Baptisms at an Acts 29 church in Alaska. It was 10 degrees and snowing. These pictures are a beautiful picture of the gospel.
  13. Mark Driscoll on What we tell our kids about Santa Claus. Helpful piece for parents.
  14. Is it disrespectful to Jesus to call it Xmas?

Links of the Week

  1. Steve Jobs on the branding of Apple. Branding is so important and churches miss the boat so many times. Branding can have to do with mission, your church name, logo, etc. Pastors need to think through branding more because it is how you can be easily remembered and identified in your city. This is why we named ourselves Revolution and use 3 dots for our logo.
  2. How Christians can be faithful and politically present in our culture. Interesting interview.
  3. John Piper spent 224 sermons preaching through the book of Romans, but you can listen to these 11 messages and get the big picture overview. You can download the 11 key messages here.
  4. Forbes on Nextflix killed Blockbuster, but Apple, Amazon and Microsoft won’t be so easy.
  5. Mark Galli on Insignificant is Beautiful.
  6. The next Acts 29 boot camp is in Phoenix next week. So excited about spending the week at it.
  7. Kevin DeYoung on What’s wrong with theistic evolution. This is an interesting interview with the editor of the new book God & Evolution.
  8. One year later: an interview with Matt Chandler and what having cancer has taught him.
  9. What pastors and business leaders can learn from each other.
  10. Al Mohler on What we know from the elections on Tuesday.
  11. Download the audio from Acts 29 Seattle Boot Camp. Great stuff.
  12. Have you bought coffee yet to support our adoption? You can do so here (it’s really good).
  13. Watch this video of Andy Stanley talking about momentum. Anything with Andy Stanley on leadership is worth listening to or reading.
  14. Will Mancini on The tyranny of more. He lists out the 6 myths that cause churches to try to do everything. Revolution is a simple church, which means we only do 5 things (worship, groups, mission, students and children’s ministry). It is this clarity that I believe is one of our strengths as a church. I just preached on it if you are interested.
  15. Changing a church culture. Cultures are hard to change because they are so natural in how they come about. You have to change thinking, not just what you do to change a church.
  16. Ed Stetzer’s thoughts on Jim Swilley (a Prominent megachurch pastor) who came out of the closet this week. Stetzer raises some great questions that churches and leaders have to wrestle through in terms of how we respond to homosexuality and what Scripture has to say. While Scripture is clear where God stands on it, we have often missed the boat in communicating that and all the layers to the discussion. We need to do better at communicating truth.

Links of the Week

  1. Never make fun of your spouse. My wife Katie has been doing a series of blog posts on our relationship rules and this one is broken by so many spouses. This one change would make a world of difference in your marriage.
  2. All you need to know about church planting in 3 minutes.
  3. Ron Edmondson on Addressing a porn generation.
  4. 4 lessons from Martin Luther on Marriage. This is a great article.
  5. Dave Bruskas on What I’ve learned from raising daughters. Dave is a pastor in New Mexico and has raised 4 daughters so I’d take that as being an expert on the topic.
  6. Gabe Lyons on A third way for the ‘Christian nation’ debate.
  7. How to leave a church well. Sometimes people leave for good reasons and leave well, but often they leave for poor reasons and leave the church by throwing rocks. Love the example from the book of Acts, maybe that is why churches today don’t see the effectives they did in the book of Acts.
  8. Pastors who suffering from relational anorexia. Pastoring is one of the loneliest jobs on the planet, but there are some things you can do to fight it.
  9. Tony Morgan on Signs you have a vision that inspires. These are right on, the clarity at Revolution has inspired people and repelled people. Vision divides and that is okay.
  10. Who needs porn when you have MTV? This is crucial for parents to keep in mind as they raise kids and what they allow on TV. (Note: there is a semi-explicit photo accompanying the article).
  11. 10 easy bible verses for kids to memorize. We have a verse of the week at our house and it has been awesome to see the kids start memorizing scripture.
  12. Loving our Muslim neighbors. This is a great video panel discussion with J.D. Greear and Thabiti Anyabwile.
  13. Christopher Wright on The biggest obstacle for world missions is idolatry. This is a convicting article.
  14. J. Oswald Sanders on Are you ready to be a leader? These are great questions to work through if you want to enter into leadership or have a desire to take on more leadership in your church or business.